Concerns over rainwater runoff possible heading into St. Lucie River

“Polluted water may be heading into the St. Lucie Estuary soon and it’s not coming from Lake Okeechobee,” according to WPTV. “The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is planning to send runoff from the St. Lucie Canal through the St. Lucie Locks in Stuart … Click here to read more

Local State of Emergency declared in Martin County; Commissioners urge Governor to act

The Martin County Board of County Commission stands with citizens who are demanding swift action about the impacts associated with the damaging freshwater discharges from Lake Okeechobee to the St. Lucie Estuary. Commissioners have proceeded with declaring a local State of Emergency … Click here to read more

Corps to increase flows as Lake O rises

With levels in Lake Okeechobee rising over the past month, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District will increase discharges to the east and west to help ensure safe management of lake levels during the upcoming wet season. … Click here to read more

Water discharges from Lake O into St. Lucie Estuary begin again

From WPTV: “Promptly at 6:52 a.m. Friday, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began discharging water from Lake Okeechobee into the St. Lucie Estuary toward the Indian River Lagoon. The discharges are small compared to 2013 but local activists say one drop is too much. … Click here to read more

State and local officials break ground on Bessey Creek Hybrid Wetland Project in Palm City

State and local officials broke ground Thursday on the new state-of-the-art Hybrid Wetland Treatment Technology (HWTT) project on Bessey Creek in Palm City. The water quality improvement project, funded with $3 million from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS), was approved by the Martin County Board of County Commissioners in 2014 … Click here to read more

‘Martin County vs. The World: Here Come de Judge’

Former editor and controversial columnist at The Stuart News, Nancy Smith, now executive editor at The Sunshine State News, details her views on proposed amendments to The Martin County Comprehensive Growth Management Plan: “Why would county commissioners approve changes to their comprehensive plan they knew would be challenged … Click here to read more

Corps to increase flows from Lake Okeechobee

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District has announced plans to increase the water releases from Lake Okeechobee as part of efforts to manage the rising lake level. The new target flow for the St. Lucie Estuary is 1,800 cfs as measured at the St. Lucie Lock & Dam (S-80) near Stuart. The new target flow is effective at 7 a.m. Saturday. … Click here to read more

WPTV video: Gov. Scott to visit on Tuesday; SFWMD acts on CEPP; Sen. Nelson views area

Governor Rick Scott will tour the St. Lucie Estuary on Tuesday, as concerns over toxic algae and high levels of bacteria continue to grow. The announcement came hours after the governing board of the South Florida Water Management District tentatively approved the Central Everglades Planning Project, as Senator Bill Nelson toured the Treasure Coast. … Click here to read more

CBS12: Emotions run high at water advisory panel in Jensen Beach

CBS 12 reports that normally the commission panel meets with little ado to address the issues of funding and Everglades Restoration projects. But on Thursday, the Water Resource Advisory Commission meeting is charged with emotion from the public. … Click here to read more

Martin County Commission: ‘Speak up for the St. Lucie’

Commissioners and citizens are greatly concerned about the impact of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ decision to release water from Lake Okeechobee to the St. Lucie Estuary. If you are concerned over the repeated insult to our estuary caused by these releases, you can help by “speaking up” in the following ways … Click here to read more

Harbor Branch study conclusively ties St. Lucie Estuary damage to Lake O releases

TCPalm reports: The lake releases combined with local stormwater runoff to create a “perfect storm” that has killed off oysters and seagrasses, given fish lesions, caused algal blooms and raised coliform levels in the water to a point that’s unsafe for humans. … Click here to read more