Florida governor signs Lake Okeechobee bill, 10 others

From WFLA: “A plan to build reservoirs south of Florida’s Lake Okeechobee to treat polluted water before it flows downstream is now law. Republican Gov. Rick Scott signed the bill on Tuesday, which was a top priority for Senate President Joe Negron (R-Stuart) … Click here to read more

Final passage of Negron Bill: Plan to reduce Lake O discharges heads to Gov Scott

Senate Bill 10, Water Resources, by Senator Rob Bradley (R-Fleming Island) saw final passage in both the Florida Senate and the Florida House of Representatives today. The legislation will now be sent to Florida Governor Rick Scott. Senate Bill 10 authorizes a significant increase in southern water storage to further the goal of reducing and eventually eliminating harmful discharges from Lake Okeechobee, a priority of Senate President Joe Negron (R-Stuart) … Click here to read more

Lawmakers agree to pay for Lake Okeechobee reservoir

From WPTV: “Historic action was taken Tuesday to try to avoid a future algae crisis on the Treasure Coast. The Florida House and Senate agreed to pay for a reservoir south of Lake Okeechobee to curb future lake discharges to the east and west … Click here to read more

Revised Lake Okeechobee bill heads to the Senate floor

From The Associated Press: “Top Florida Republicans have taken a big step toward making their plan of building a reservoir south of Lake Okeechobee an easier-to-swallow proposal for its opponents. A Senate budget committee on Wednesday approved drastic changes to the project, which seeks to divert toxic algae blooms … Click here to read more

US Army Corps of Engineers doesn’t expect to see water releases like 2016

From WPTV: “Even though there are not drastic changes as to how the Army Corps of Engineers stores and releases water, it doesn’t think we will see conditions that created the murky, toxic blue-green algae that plagued the Treasure Coast; and the reason is rain … Click here to read more

Sugar farmers balk at selling land for reservoir

From WPTV: “Sugar farmers who own land in an area targeted by Senate President Joe Negron for a reservoir south of Lake Okeechobee said Monday they won’t be ‘willing sellers’ to the state … Click here to read more

Replumbing South Florida

From Fly Rod & Reel: “After heavy rains last winter the Army Corps of Engineers protected cattle ranchers, dairy farmers and sugarcane growers in Lake Okeechobee’s watershed by dumping their polluted water on distant residents of the Atlantic and Gulf coasts. This time at least 161 cities suffered … Click here to read more

Corps to reduce flows from Lake Okeechobee

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District plans to reduce flows from Lake Okeechobee this weekend as it begins a transition toward dry-season operations … Click here to read more

Corps to increase discharges from Lake O

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District will increase flows from Lake Okeechobee to the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie Estuaries starting this weekend. Effective Friday (Sept. 23) – The new target flow for the St. Lucie is 1,800 cfs measured at St. Lucie Lock & Dam (S-80) near Stuart. Additional runoff from rain in the St. Lucie basin could occasionally result in flows that exceed targets … Click here to read more

Associated Press: FL Senate leader Joe Negron (R-Stuart) proposes $2B Lake Okeechobee cleanup

“The Florida Senate’s incoming president has announced a $2.4 billion plan aimed at reducing toxic algae outbreaks in the rivers flowing from Lake Okeechobee. Joe Negron said Tuesday that his plan calls for buying 60,000 acres of land south of Lake Okeechobee and turning it into reservoirs … Click here to read more

Palm Beach Post: Governor focuses on septic tanks to combat blue-green algae

“Gov. Rick Scott said last week that he plans to seek state money to help curb what he calls a “major contributor” to the pollution problem — septic tanks. Many say the governor’s approach would not eliminate the recurrent problem of blue-green algae choking inland waters … Click here to read more