Raccoon tests positive for rabies in Sewall’s Point

 

The most common carriers of rabies are raccoons, skunks, bats, foxes and coyotes. (Source: Floridahealth.gov)

A raccoon that came in contact with two dogs in Sewall’s Point has tested positive for rabies.

The dogs were vaccinated and will receive a booster.

As a precaution, the dogs are quarantined and monitored by Martin County Animal Control.

This is the second case of rabies in Martin County this year.

The first also involved a raccoon and occurred in January in Stuart.

Rabies is a virus that is transmitted from the bite or scratch of a rabid animal. Any mammal can get rabies.

The most common carriers of rabies are raccoons, skunks, bats, foxes and coyotes. Domestic mammals can also get rabies. Cats are the most frequently reported rabid domestic animal in the United States.

The first symptoms of rabies may be very similar to those of the flu including general weakness or discomfort, fever, or headache. These symptoms may last for days.

There may be also discomfort or a prickling or itching sensation at the site of bite, progressing within days to symptoms of cerebral dysfunction, anxiety, confusion, agitation. As the disease progresses, the person may experience delirium, abnormal behavior, hallucinations, and insomnia.

The acute period of disease typically ends after 2 to 10 days. Once clinical signs of rabies appear, the disease is nearly always fatal, and treatment is typically supportive.

Disease prevention includes administration of both passive antibody, through an injection of human immune globulin and a round of injections with rabies vaccine.

Once a person begins to exhibit signs of the disease, survival is rare. To date less than 10 documented cases of human survival from clinical rabies have been reported and only two have not had a history of pre- or postexposure prophylaxis.
Ways to prevent rabies:

  • Make sure your pets are up to date with their rabies vaccinations.
  • Do not feed or handle wild animals.
  • If you see an animal acting strangely, call Martin County Animal Control at 772-463-3211.
  • If you get bitten by an animal, wash the wound with soap and water for at least 5 minutes and see a doctor.
  • Do not touch dead animals. Use gloves to remove and dispose of the animal properly.
  • Avoid direct human and domestic animal contact with wild animals.
  • Have your veterinarian vaccinate pets and at-risk livestock, make sure you follow your veterinarian’s instructions for revaccination.
  • Do not allow your pets to run free. Follow leash laws by keeping pets and livestock secured on your property.
  • Never feed wild or stray animals-avoid attracting them with outdoors food sources. Feed your pets indoors.
  • If your animal is attacked by a wild, stray or unvaccinated animal, DO NOT examine your pet for injuries without wearing gloves. DO wash your pet with soap and water to remove saliva from the attacking animal. DO NOT let your animal come into contact with other animals or people until the situation can be handled by animal control or county health department staff.
  • Educate the public to reduce contact with stray and feral animals.
  • Support animal control in efforts to reduce feral and stray animal populations.
  • Provide pre-exposure prophylaxis for people in high-risk professions, such as animal control and veterinary personnel, laboratory workers, and those working with wildlife.
  • Bat-proof homes.

 

Related posts:


Comments are closed.